The Moon Series

A personal photography series about our moon.

About the moon series

One of my fascinations is the universe, astronomy and everything attached with it. The assignment is to document the moon with a camera for several years.

This (still is) a long project for me, and I will continue to add photos and information as time goes on.

The latest picture you see here on the right.

The moon on 18 February 2019

La luna

This series will start with my first ever documented photo of the moon, made with my phone. Each picture has a backstory and information about the picture.

I hope you can learn from the mistakes I made. The moon series is perfect to start making beautiful photos yourself. Each photo has information such as: Time taken, luminosity of the moon and of course the camera settings. More information will be added about the pictures the deeper you go into the series.

Enjoy!


Time taken 00:29

Camera settings

  • ƒ 1.71

  • Shutter speed 1/2000 s

  • 4.2 mm lens

  • ISO 80

March 2017

Maybe not what you expected, but this is my first picture of the moon. Taken with my Samsung S4, maximum zoom. This picture started the series for me. After this picture I tried to see how far I could push technology that was in my reach.

It might not be the best picture ever, but that’s how everything starts. You only get better by practice, practice and more practice. The beauty of this rule is that it is meant for everything.

You will see how this continues in the following picture. For now here are the statistics for this picture.


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Luminosity


June 2017

After trying to make pictures with my phone I felt like it was time to start doing it more professional. So I borrowed a telescope that my brother had and started using it to make pictures of the moon. I held my Samsung S4 against the lens of the telescope and tried to make several pictures, I was astonished about how much it improved and what kind of detail I could see! Simply amazing. 

Still, this is not anything near the pictures I had seen in magazines and the internet. I had to keep going.

But I knew this was just the start of my discovery on how to photograph the moon with more detail.


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Luminosity

Time taken 01:45

Camera settings

  • National Geographic Telescope N 114/900 AZ

  • ƒ 1.71

  • Shutter speed 1/120 s

  • 4.2 mm lens

  • ISO 320


Time taken 22:56

Camera settings

  • 357 mm

  • Shutter speed 1/3 s

  • ISO 100

September 2018

A huge leap in time forward – I had to improve my photography in order to get better photos. Therefor I decided that it would be wise to start buying an actual camera. It had to be a camera that allows me to make pictures of different astronomical objects. But on the other hand it also had to be a camera that could function as a camera for everyday objects.

This was a difficult job, and it took me quite some time to find a camera within my budget and that could suffice the requirements. I started doing serious research about my career as a photographer and found that there was a camera with an incredible 125x zoom. It was the Nikon P900 and it looked like a very exciting camera.

After days of deliberation I decided to buy it. I was incredibly happy and started trying it out to picture the moon. The first ever picture taken was the picture you see here on the left.


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Luminosity


11 Februari 2019

A new place, a new camera and more time to capture the moon. In the period from September 2018 to now I have moved to Madrid, Spain and each night there is a good chance that I would see the moon. Therefor I will be posting the state of the moon and my findings with the P900 as much as I can. 

One of the things I learned about the app that’s used for transfering photos from your camera to your phone, is that the resolution is quite low. I currently transfer the pictures through the Wi-Fi function of the camera and the WMU app, short for; Nikon Wireless Mobile Utility App.

The app works, and that basically says it all. The resolution of the photos downscales to 1440×1080 pixels when you transfer it to your phone. The app is made by Nikon, you can make pictures with it remotely, which is quite nice but also produces low quality images. I only recommend using this app when you’re comfortable with photos having a 1.6 Megapixel quality. For social media it works like a charm, printing however, not so much.


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Luminosity - Waxing Crescent

Time taken 20:28

Camera settings

  • 16 Megapixel

  • 428.4 mm

  • ISO 100


Time taken 23:56

Camera settings

  • 428 mm

  • 16 Megapixels

  • ISO 100

17 February 2019

One of the most difficult things about capturing the moon right now for me is placing the camera in the right position. I bought a tripod and I sometimes struggle with keeping the moon in the full frame. The moon is constantly moving and I do not have a remote control to make photos without moving it to much.

Therefor I have to set a 2 or 10 second timer, based on if I get lucky with position my tripod and camera in the right position. In 10 seconds, the moon usually runs out of the frame. In 2 seconds the tripod still has a little vibration, causing the picture to not be sharp.

 


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Luminosity - Waxing Gibbous


18 Februari 2019

One more day until the full moon and it’s very exciting that nearly every day it has been a nice evening without any clouds. I sadly don’t have every day to photograph this beautiful phenomenon but I surely will be capturing the full moon tomorrow. 

I’m slowly but surely getting used to the Nikon P900 and all of the functions it has. I’m one of those people who never reads the manual and just dives into his new camera like a maniac and starts snapping pictures of everything. 

But…After a while of discovering new things about it, I decided to read the manual and noticed all of the functions it has (it even has a moon capture function, WHAT IN THE WORLD!).

 


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Luminosity - Waxing Crescent

Time taken 23:31

Camera settings

  • 16 Megapixels

  • 428.4 mm

  • ISO 100


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